Overcoming the fear of rejection

September 22, 2016

Filed under: Fundraising — jonathanpoisner @ 10:36 am

When people say they are “afraid” of making fundraising asks one-on-one with a prospective donor, there are many facets to that fear.

One is the age-old fear of rejection.  Everyone fears rejection to some degree.  We fear it in our personal lives when we ask people to do something or in our professional lives.

Even the most magnificent major donor fundraiser will feel rejection.  Indeed, if they don’t sometimes receive a “no,” it undoubtedly means they aren’t asking enough people to donate.

There’s no magic solution to this challenge.

But there are some mental techniques that have helped other fundraisers get past this fear.

For one, we can recalibrate in our minds what we mean by success.  Don’t judge success by school standards (90% = an A, 80% = a B, etc.).  Judge yourselves by major donor fundraiser standards (anything better than 50% yes is pretty darn good).

Another tool is to recognize that most “no’s” are really “yes” to something else.  You may be “selling” hamburgers while they want hot dogs.  You may be selling environmental protection while they want to feed the hungry.  In other words, they may have other nonprofits or campaigns they wish to prioritize.  Or, in other cases, really valid personal needs that they need to prioritize.  It will be an exceptionally rare circumstance where someone will say “no” to you while saying they’re going to invest their dollars in something you actively oppose.

Another thing to always bear in mind is that many “no’s” are actually “not now.” They may have already given away all they can during the period in time, but perhaps you’ve set them up for a big gift next year.  Your success is having primed the pump for a future ask that will succeed.

And even beyond future gifts, you can learn to recognize the many other positive outcomes that can come out of a relationship-focused donor meeting even if no gift materializes.  They can volunteer.  They may have offered ideas you like for how the organization can do something differently.  You may learn about something else happening in the community.  You may get leads or referrals to other donor prospects.  I’ve experienced each of these outcomes and by focusing on the positive, the “sting” of rejection quickly faded.

In the end, all the mental tricks in the world won’t fully eliminate the momentary feeling that something is awry when people tell us “no.”  It’s still part of our human nature.  But by thinking consciously about it, successful major donor fundraisers can quickly go from “fear” of rejection to embracing the good that comes out of any one-on-one donor meeting.

If you have other techniques you have used to get past your own fear of fundraising, please let me know!

A primer on nonprofit dashboards

June 6, 2016

Filed under: Fundraising,Strategic Planning — jonathanpoisner @ 3:29 pm

What’s a nonprofit dashboard?

Why should my nonprofit consider getting one?

And how should we develop one?

These are some of the questions I address in a recent guest blog for The Databank.

In addition, I recently gave a presentation on dashboards for the Nonprofit Network of Southwest Washington.  Here are the slides from the presentation.  

Check them out and then let me know what you think.

Thoughts on developing a culture of philanthropy

May 12, 2016

Filed under: Fundraising,Leadership — jonathanpoisner @ 11:59 am

Beyond the nuts and bolts of fundraising, one topic that often emerges when I work with clients is how to imbue the organization with a culture that supports fundraising growth.

The term we often settle on is “culture of philanthropy.”

Why does culture matter?  Management guru Peter Drucker famously wrote: “Culture eats strategy for breakfast.”

As a strategic planning consultant, I’d be the last to tell you that culture trumps strategy.  But it’s also the case that culture is incredibly important over time.

So what is a culture of philanthropy?

Ask 10 fundraising consultants for their definition of this term, and you’ll likely get 10 different responses.

For me, it boils down to the following.  If an organization has a culture of philanthropy, then everyone in the organization, including staff, board, and key volunteers:

  • Can articulate the case for giving to the organization
  • Understands the importance of fundraising to the organization
  • Happily serves as ambassadors for the organization
  • Has at least some explicit role in the fundraising process

In addition, two other things need to hold true:

  • Where an organization has a culture of philanthropy, donors are valued first and foremost for the relationships they offer, and not just for the money they donate.
  • Development is viewed as an engagement process that is integrated with the organization’s programs and communications rather than operating in a silo.

This is as much an attitude and mind-set as a specific system.

So how does an organization go about creating a culture of philanthropy?

There’s no magic formula, but here are a handful of the most important steps in my mind:

  • There must be leadership from the top.  The Executive Director and Board need to champion the culture and model it with how they behave.
  • Everyone brought into the team must enter with clear expectations (preferably in writing) that matches up with a culture of philanthropy.
  • Planning should take place that consciously evaluates how programs and communications can be used as tools to engage current and potential donors.
  • The whole team must receive training so they feel confident in their ability to participate in the fundraising process.
  • Fundraising plans should be developed with an aim towards strategies that maximize the long-term value of relationships with donors and not just short-term revenue.
  • Cheeleading and celebration should be consciously used as tools to elevate and thank those who’re embracing the culture.
  • “Violations” of the culture should receive an appropriate response.

Of course, each of these steps could be worthy of a separate blog post about how to put them into practice.

In the end, generating a culture of philanthropy from scratch is a multi-year endeavor that requires commitment.  But the payoff for those organizations who achieve this cultural transformation can be huge.

Essential Major Donor Toolkit Workshop

May 5, 2016

Filed under: Fundraising — jonathanpoisner @ 3:17 pm

On June 2nd in Portland, I’ll be offering a special 3 hour workshop I’ve put together on the essentials of an effective major donor program.

It will be tailored for no more than 20 participants.

Learn more about the workshop and register online.  

Should your nonprofit use a Resource Council?

March 23, 2016

Filed under: Fundraising,Leadership — jonathanpoisner @ 2:20 pm

A Resource Council. A Council of Leaders.

These are two names I’ve experienced as alternatives to an “Advisory Board,” which is more common in the nonprofit world.

What I like about the alternative formulation is you’re more explicitly naming the group for what it most should provide: resources.

The Council should be a group of 6-12 non-board volunteers who’re committed to doing something to help your organization secure more resources.

As a Council, they are probably only brought together once a year to meet with the organization’s other leadership. Perhaps one extra time if the organization is going through strategic planning.

The Council should have a written job description and some leadership –whether provided by a staff member, the Council Chair, or both. The Council should have an annual goal or goals — usually based on the resources the Council will help the group obtain.

This is a great way to involve those people who are in a position to help an organization, but don’t want to wade through all the nitty gritty of board governance.

Has your organization used a Council (by whatever name it’s called)? What’s worked well and what hasn’t worked well?

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Donor Stewardship Basics and Beyond

November 23, 2015

Filed under: Fundraising — jonathanpoisner @ 4:55 pm

I recently put together a presentation for The Databank on effective donor stewardship, which some people call donor cultivation.

You can check out the slides from the webinar below.

 

Donor stewardship from Jonathan Poisner Strategic Consulting

Your organization is an intermediary

June 24, 2015

Filed under: Communications,Fundraising — jonathanpoisner @ 1:11 pm

One of the more interesting words I recently heard used to describe nonprofits is as “intermediaries.”

Under this way of thinking, your organization isn’t the protagonist in your story.

Instead, those who support your organization are the protagonists. The donors, whether individual or institutional.

Their passion is what matters.

Passion for what? Not for your organization, although they may well also have that.

Instead, it’s their passion for the community impact or change that you’re making.

You are the intermediary that helps the donor make the impact that they want, where the donor can’t do the work directly.

If you start thinking this way, you’ll avoid the trap of your fundraising materials being all about how great the organization is. Your case should instead be about the tremendous impact the donors are making for the community and how satisfying it is to play a key role in making that change happen.

You are the intermediary.

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Questions from Joan Garry to ask candidates for your fundraising job

Filed under: Fundraising,Human Resources — jonathanpoisner @ 1:00 pm

Joan Garry has some superb questions to ask those interviewing with you for a fundraising job, as well as what types of answers you should hope they provide.

I particularly liked Joan’s questions on their approach to philanthropy and how they would work with a board.

http://www.joangarry.com/recognize-top-fundraiser/

Donor meeting locations

Filed under: Fundraising — jonathanpoisner @ 12:50 pm

One of the truisms of fundraising, corroborated by expert fundraisers across nearly every type of nonprofit is that meeting in-person with donors almost always provides the best way to upgrade a donor to a more significant level of giving.

Which begs the question, where do you meet with them?

Rather than rushing ahead to the answer, start by reminding yourself: why are you meeting with them?

In general, you’re meeting with them to:

  • Get to know them better
  • Have them get to know you better
  • Have them better understand how the organization’s work matches up with their values
  • Ask for their support.

Given those goals, the major area of concern would be if the location is not sufficiently private for people to feel comfortable discussing their values or their money.  Likewise, the venue shouldn’t be so noisy that it interferes with the flow of the conversation.

So in order of priority, I’d suggest asking them if they’d like to meet at their home or place of business.

You can say something like: “I’d be happy to meet you at your home or work if that’s convenient to you, or we can figure out some other option.”

If they leave you the choice, opt for the home.

If they say they are interseted in another option, my next recommendation would be if you have some location that demonstrates the value of your work.  This could be a mini-tour.  But only if there’s a quiet place to talk and sit down while doing so.

If nothing like that fits the bill, I’d then suggest your office.  But that’s only if your office meets standards of professionalism that will match up with a donors’ expectations.

Lastly, if that’s not feasible, suggest a coffee shop or restaurant.  A public location is least likely to be conducive to the conversaion and most likely to offer up distractions.  With that said, it’s sometimes the right choice.  While you want to go somewhere good, prioritize places you know are usually not busy.  The last thing you want is for you and the donor to show up at a coffee shop where there’s no place to sit.

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The power of asking good questions

March 25, 2015

Filed under: Fundraising — jonathanpoisner @ 11:35 am

When I’m asked what are the most important attributes for an effective major donor fundraiser, I often say: “nothing beats being naturally curious.”  Because a good fundraiser doesn’t talk at a prospect, he or she has a conversation and comes away learning a great deal about the donor/prospect.   For people who’re naturally curious, this comes easily as they’re full of questions.

Of course, not everyone is naturally curious.  Others need to be more conscious of the power of asking good questions and think ahead of time about potential questions to ask.

Good questions accomplish a variety of goals within a major donor meeting.

  • They elicit informaion about what the donor thinks about your work.
  • They elicit information about what else the donor cares about.
  • They evoke passion in the donor.
  • They help the donor identify the connection between their personal values and the organization’s work.

Here are some examples of questions that accomplish these goals.

What do you love about your work?

Why did you first get interested in X?  (X could be their career, their volunteer work, a cause, a hobby, etc.)

Why does our cause matter to you?

Which of our programs are most appealing to you?

What’s the best gift you ever made?

What are your top philanthropic priorities?

The list could, of course, be much longer.  And perhaps importantly, you should prime yourself to ask follow-up questions as people answer these in ways that generate more questions in your mind.

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